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MORE BOXING
posted: January 23, 2008
Over time, I've been trying to get some of the direct painting that I enjoy so much when painting outside into the work i do in my studio and more planed illustrations. Here is another attempt. The figure on the left has such a stable and solid gesture compared to the more twisted fella on the right . . . both faces fully expressing the moment.
Over time, I've been trying to get some of the direct painting that I enjoy so much when painting outside into the work i do in my studio and more planed illustrations. Here is another attempt. The figure on the left has such a stable and solid gesture compared to the more twisted fella on the right . . . both faces fully expressing the moment.
9 comments
Dale Stephanos January 23, 2008
These are beautiful Peter.
df January 23, 2008
PBF vs DeLaHoya!
Cathie Bleck January 23, 2008
Your work is juicy and you are one talented man!
Doug Fraser January 24, 2008
I agree with you comments about Bellows. His piece is an icon which it seems to overshadow everything else. Do think in it's day it might not have been not so readily embraced. Photography and television have somewhat eroded the present arena. The back of the fighter taking the punch, and the white trunks really stand out. Are you working with oils?
Tim O\'Brien January 24, 2008
Thanks for the inspiration. Great work as always Peter.
Doug Fraser January 24, 2008
In regards to your post about the rhythm of shadow planes with islands of mid tone in them. Of course the reverse is the case in the highlights. You have a strong brush mark describing those planes. Mark making and descriptive form are blending nicely in what your doing. My own brush work is not present in my painted work. I've only started to really be comfortable with brush marks in ink, but I do agree about your comment in our drawings. Thanks.
Peter Cusack January 24, 2008
Thanks for the comments guys. Doug, I am working with oil. HMMMM, I wonder if it was. Im sure the public reaction is recorded somewhere. Maybe I will try to look that up. In general, when Bellows was working many artists were striking out to find a unique point of view. Painting technique became less important and what an artist painted, his effective composition, and then I think color were more important. I read somewhere that Bellows painted quantity and let the quality take care of itself. I know there were established critics that didn't like this new visceral work, but it was a movement and a feeling shared among so many artists at the time and across the world. Here in NY, Henri was in a great position to administer this new spirit as a teacher. So was WM Chase, in a different way by promoting the premier coup style of painting. Sargent too fits here as well. I agree with you that TV and photography and film has eroded the arena and has taken a certain sensibility away from our culture. Being a young artist i look to artists like Bellows to find a reason to paint, the joy, and as a guide to find my visceral point of view. Thanks for the discussion and comments
Zina Saunders January 25, 2008
A wonderful combination of subtlety and power.
Peter Cusack January 25, 2008
I always feel like you get it! Your comment really describes the feeling i have too. Oh and HI!
cusack.buglogic.com